Posted By Posting
Nov 30, 2010
dcd
Lorenzomama
Hi, I have been wondering about Lorenzo's sensory processing difficulties. I know it took you a long time to identify this as the root of many of his issues. Now that you know it is a major factor, how are you dealing with it? How do you help correct or improve this condition?
Dec 04, 2010
lorenzomama
Lorenzo b.4/25/07 1 week in NICU w/ aspirate pneumonia from a reflux episode; diagnosed GERD at 9weeks; Used Zantac for 5months. Currently using Chinese Medicine and Craniosacral Therapy. GERD, Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Sensory Processing Disorder. Ask me about breastfeeding a refluxer! Pic: day 5 in the NICU.
Sorry it's taking me so long to respond to this -- one of the main things we have been doing is a 12 week intensive treatment program with his Chinese Medicine Practitioner and Cranio-Sacral Therapist and two weeks ago we decided to try cutting back the weekly visits to every other week. It has not gone very well, which has translated to a lot of challenges particularly regarding sleep. I promise I will get back to this and answer you questions, but I have to get a little sleep in while he is sleeping, as it's not a state he's spending much time in lately....
Dec 06, 2010
lorenzomama
Lorenzo b.4/25/07 1 week in NICU w/ aspirate pneumonia from a reflux episode; diagnosed GERD at 9weeks; Used Zantac for 5months. Currently using Chinese Medicine and Craniosacral Therapy. GERD, Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Sensory Processing Disorder. Ask me about breastfeeding a refluxer! Pic: day 5 in the NICU.
We are still trying to coordinate with a pediatric OT to address the SPD issues, but in the meantime, we have been engaging in an intensive treatment plan with our Chinese Medicine Practitioner and Cranio-Sacral Therapist, as well as making an effort to create appropriate and adequate sensory experiences at home each day. The combination of these, plus the unexpected benefits of acquiring a puppy -- which has widened his world considerably, especially with regard to tactile sensitivities -- have gone a long way toward improving his situation already. He has gone from having numerous challenges every single day that interfere with normal daily life, to having a few significant areas of challenge, but few that interfere substantially with a normal childhood experience at this point. We still have a long way to go to get to the point where he would likely experience success out in the world -- in group settings, in particular -- but he has come a long way in a short time.

We did just make an effort to reduce the frequency of his visits with the CM and CS practitioners, but we foolishly did so over the Thanksgiving holidays and he backslid quite a bit. So for now, we are back to weekly visits that involve cranio-sacral therapy, aromatherapy, and massage/bodywork.

My understanding is that, when diagnosed very young, when the brain is still in the process of "wiring" itself, there is a good chance that, with appropriate therapies, the brain can literally normalize. The older a person gets, and the more ingrained the circuitry of the brain, the more coping and compensation is required, rather than recovery, per se.

My hope, of course, is that we have identified it early enough, and will provide adequate therapies, to allow Lorenzo to be free from the challenges of SPD as he grows up. It is very painful to watch him struggle with some of the things other people take for granted -- especially in terms of being able to connect with and enjoy other people and the typical activities of childhood. Not to mention the toll it could take on his physical health, since part of his response to the things that frighten or upset him is over-stimulation of his sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system -- resulting in a tendency toward tachycardia, exacerbated reflux and other digestive troubles, and apnea episodes.

For anyone interested in learning more about SPD and how it is identified and treated, I cannot recommend highly enough "The Out of Sync Child" by Karol Stock Kranowitz and "Sensational Kids" by Lucy Jane Miller.

Check with your
doctor first!