Posted By Posting
Oct 21, 2008
baby quinn's mommy
Mom to a 3 year old baby girl with severe reflux: g-tube, nissen fundoplication. dx: RAD, failure to thrive, DGE, epilepsy, sleep apnea, paraesohphogeal hernia, high lactic acid there's more "unknown disease"... Hospitalized 12 times, PT graduate! ST graduate! OT graduate! Current Meds: singulair, zopeonex, pulmicort, reglan, Keppra, Trileptal, vitamin B6, Veramyst. Current weight: 34 lb. Current height: 39". g-tube dependent, oxygen 1-2LpM all day and night PIC: Ms. Quinn
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Hiatal Hernia???
One of the many reasons for switching hospitals is the lack of communication!!!

I got a copy of Quinn's medical records from Inland Regional, who apparently can get more pull out of the hospital than I can, thank goodness! Quinn had a g-tube check in the beginning of this year with the radiologist. In his report, it says that Quinn had a hiatal hernia. WTF??? Nobody ever told me that! And I always ask them if it was normal. Aren't they suppose to give that kind of information, whether it needs to be treated or not, I think it's important as a parent to know this. Particularly due to her feeding and GI issues.

So, what are the symptoms? What IS a hiatal hernia? When should I be concerned that she has it? does it get worse/better over time? Can it affect her breathing? UGH!!! I'm pretty frustrated about it!

-Sarah

Oct 21, 2008
jessicalynn
Brent 2 years old,
Birthweight 12 lbs 3.3 oz!
Very severe GERD,LPR,FTT
Severe esophagitis/scarring
Paraesophageal Hiatal Hernia,
Esophageal Dysmotility,
Food impaction,Aspiration
ALTE,Dysphagia,Odynophagia
Eosinophilic Esophagitis,Severe retching
Severe allergic colitis/malabsorption
Susp eosinophilic colitis,chronic diarrhea,
Laryngomalacia,Gas/Bloat Syndrome,
Visceral Hyperalgesia,GI Dysmotility,
Chronic infection(ear/sinus/lung)
Adenoid/tonsillar hypertrophy
Gait abnormality/bowlegs,widened growth plates
Susp Vagus Nerve Damage
Surgeries, Nissen fundo,hernia repair/
reconstruction,esophageal dilation,gtube,
ear tubes,adenoidectomy
Bronchs w/ BAL's,lung biopsy
Upcoming scope/colonoscopy
Manometry testing in Oct.
Meds: Nexium,Zantac,Baclofen, Neurontin,
Zofran,Pulmicort/Splenda,PrednisonePRN,
NPO tubefed continuous elecare 24 hours/day
If it isnt large, then it shouldnt cause problems. Large hernias can definately worsen reflux.Having a nissen puts kids at higher risk of developing a hernia. Hiatal hernia is a condition in which the upper portion of the stomach protrudes into the chest cavity through an opening of the diaphragm called the esophageal hiatus. This opening usually is large enough to accommodate the esophagus alone. With weakening and enlargement however, the opening (or herniation) can allow upward passage or even entrapment of the upper stomach above the diaphragm. Most hernias are sliding. Brent had a paraesophageal hiatal hernia in which almost his stomach was trapped up in his chest, it was dangerous.
Oct 21, 2008
sadie
Our 1 year old daughter has silent reflux, hypotonia as well as benign external hydrocephalus. We are currently weaning onto whole milk (we'll see if it works) and she is also on Prevacid 15mg per day.
I have one. They say I was probably born with it. They found it during an endoscopy. All they said was (this was when I was like 19 or so) that they won't do surgery on it and that it will make my reflux worse and could even be the cause of my reflux. My mother and grandmother have one. Makes me wonder if Keira does too. I know how you feel about not knowing all the details. When Keira saw the neurosurgeon about her head circumference I asked the doctor what the diagnosis was and he wrote down a term. A term. Then when I looked all that info up I thought...hmmm this really isn't describing what all he talked about. So I asked for the nurse to call back about it and they wouldn't. So I got all her medical records and read them myself. SURE ENOUGH....the second and most important diagnosis he never told me was written on his letter to Keira's pediatrician. Thanks a lot, dude! :P I tell you we have to practically get aggressive just to get the right info we need and operate w/ all the knowledge.
Oct 21, 2008
jessicalynn
Brent 2 years old,
Birthweight 12 lbs 3.3 oz!
Very severe GERD,LPR,FTT
Severe esophagitis/scarring
Paraesophageal Hiatal Hernia,
Esophageal Dysmotility,
Food impaction,Aspiration
ALTE,Dysphagia,Odynophagia
Eosinophilic Esophagitis,Severe retching
Severe allergic colitis/malabsorption
Susp eosinophilic colitis,chronic diarrhea,
Laryngomalacia,Gas/Bloat Syndrome,
Visceral Hyperalgesia,GI Dysmotility,
Chronic infection(ear/sinus/lung)
Adenoid/tonsillar hypertrophy
Gait abnormality/bowlegs,widened growth plates
Susp Vagus Nerve Damage
Surgeries, Nissen fundo,hernia repair/
reconstruction,esophageal dilation,gtube,
ear tubes,adenoidectomy
Bronchs w/ BAL's,lung biopsy
Upcoming scope/colonoscopy
Manometry testing in Oct.
Meds: Nexium,Zantac,Baclofen, Neurontin,
Zofran,Pulmicort/Splenda,PrednisonePRN,
NPO tubefed continuous elecare 24 hours/day

When the stomach is actually stuck in the chest cavity, a paraesophageal hernia,the blood supply is cut off to the trapped portion of the stomach, causing great pain and serious illness. This is called a strangulated hiatal hernia, and it is a true medical emergency. If it was that, you would know. and the dr.s would havbe informed you. I would find out more about it if I was you, see how big it is, and what the dr's think about it.

from emedicine: Hiatal Hernia Overview Hiatal hernia is a condition in which the upper portion of the stomach protrudes into the chest cavity through an opening of the diaphragm called the esophageal hiatus. This opening usually is large enough to accommodate the esophagus alone. With weakening and enlargement however, the opening (or herniation) can allow upward passage or even entrapment of the upper stomach above the diaphragm. * Hiatal hernia is a common condition. By age 60, up to 60% of people have it to some degree. * There are 2 types of hiatal hernia. * o The sliding type, as its name implies, occurs when the junction between the stomach and esophagus slides up through the esophageal hiatus during moments of increased pressure in the abdominal cavity. When the pressure is relieved, the stomach falls back down with gravity to its normal position. The fixed type (or paraesophageal) implies that there is no sliding up and down. A portion of the stomach remains stuck in the chest cavity Hiatal Hernia Symptoms For most people, a hiatal hernia by itself causes no symptoms. * Chest pain or pressure * Heartburn * Difficulty swallowing * Coughing * Belching * Hiccups * Pain: At times, a hiatal hernia causes chest pain or upper abdominal pain when the stomach becomes trapped above the diaphragm through the narrow esophageal hiatus. * Other causes: Rarely, with a fixed hiatal hernia, the blood supply is cut off to the trapped portion of the stomach, causing great pain and serious illness. This is called a strangulated hiatal hernia, and it is a true medical emergency. * Hiatal hernia also causes symptoms of discomfort when it is associated with a condition called gastroesophageal reflux disease, commonly called GERD. This condition is characterized by upwelling of stomach acids and digestive enzymes into the esophagus through a weakened sphincter that is supposed to act as a one-way valve between the esophagus and stomach. Hiatal hernia is thought to contribute to the weakening of this sphincter muscle. * o Although it is true that hiatal hernia or GERD can cause chest pain similar to angina (or heart pain) including chest pressure that can radiate to the arm or neck, do not assume that such pain is caused by the less serious condition of the two. When in doubt, it is safer to be seen by a doctor immediately in order to rule out more serious problems first. Medical Treatment * Medical treatment for hiatal hernia may include prescription-strength antacids such as lansoprazole (Prevacid), omeprazole (Prilosec), or rabeprazole (Aciphex). * Surgical treatments rarely are necessary or worth the risk unless an emergency exists, such as a strangulated hiatal hernia. * Some people don't respond to home care or medical treatment and seek the advice of a general surgeon or thoracic surgeon about the latest options. Various techniques have been tried to fix the defects of hiatal hernia with some success.

Oct 21, 2008
michelle&aurora
Aurora born March 17, 2007
3 years, 8 months old
Weighs 25.8 lbs
8 lbs 11 oz at birth.
Recovered Chronic Projectile Vomiter
Prevacid Free since September 08
Egg allergy diagnosed Jan 26/09
Has a Pectus Excavatum
Has an Epipen
oh my goodness....YEAH, they should have told you anyway. Seems there are morons in Canada and the States lately. Ugh. I don't know anything about hernias, though, Sarah. I wish I could help you as you have helped me. :( By the sounds of it, I would think this would be significant information to have considering her issues. Sheesh.
Oct 22, 2008
baby quinn's mommy
Mom to a 3 year old baby girl with severe reflux: g-tube, nissen fundoplication. dx: RAD, failure to thrive, DGE, epilepsy, sleep apnea, paraesohphogeal hernia, high lactic acid there's more "unknown disease"... Hospitalized 12 times, PT graduate! ST graduate! OT graduate! Current Meds: singulair, zopeonex, pulmicort, reglan, Keppra, Trileptal, vitamin B6, Veramyst. Current weight: 34 lb. Current height: 39". g-tube dependent, oxygen 1-2LpM all day and night PIC: Ms. Quinn
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Thank you so much for the information. It helped!
Check with your
doctor first!