Posted By Posting
Jan 07, 2008
janet h
I am thankful to my daughter for teaching me love and to PAGER for giving me strength and keeping me sane during that first year with GERD. It DOES get easier with time.
Food aversion in 4 year old
Hello, I have been off this site for almost 2 years, so I guess, reflux got much better (and it DID), and I am a better prepared parent to deal with its ugly symptoms. My question is how do you get your GERDling to try new foods? My daughter's list of food is very limited (salmon, rice, noodles, bread, buckwheat, soy milk, dry cereal, peeled apples and apple juice). Occasional cracker, chicken and a banana (may be once every 2-3 weeks). Absolutely no veggies or fruits in any form, and nothing mashed, mixed, or even sides touching other food. She has to like color and texture (mashes food with fingers to check) first, but her first reaction to 99.99% of foods is "no". She is 41 inches tall and weighs 37 lbs, and she turns 4 in ten days.
Jan 10, 2008
daniejo
Mom (Danie) to Adam (9-4-03) & Nate (3-7-07) Nate was diagnosed with silent AR at 2 months old. He was on neocate, prevacid 30mg per day and couldn't start solids till he was almost 8 months old. He started cow's milk at 14 months and is currently off all meds!! So far so good :) PIC: Disney trip 2008. Nate didn't know Piglet was there, he didn't like the characters too much.
Hi...congrats on your dd being reflux free!! I am primarily on the infant forum. I have a 4yr old with the same sort of "issues" with food and different textures. It is extremely hard for him to try new things. I have finally convinced him to at least TRY a taste of it. Most of the time he spits it out but I was very shocked at the amount of things he has said yes to. I do real goofy things with new foods...I make all sorts of things like a boat out of cantaloup with pretzels used to hold up the tortilla chip "flag". It works 50% of the time. I am sorry I cannot offer more help...I hope she starts eating more variety soon.
Jan 20, 2008
jan gambino burns
Jan Gambino, M.Ed
The Reflux Mom
P.O. Box 171
Arnold, Maryland
21012 USA
Mom to Rebecca: reflux and asthma, post nissen fundo, post g tube, post FTT and Jenna: reflux, asthma and POTS.
Author of Reflux 101: A Parent's Guide to Gastroesophageal Reflux.
http://www.lulu.com/content/4999931
Blog: www.healthcentral.com/acid-reflux/c/96
My favorite topic
Oh Janet, This is my "favorite" reflux topic! I wrote a whole series of articles on feeding based on my experiences feeding my refluxer. Go to the Reading Room section for Feeding Series. I also like the www.new-vis.com website for really practical ideas for feeding a child. I use the term "careful eating" but many will call it picky eating. My daughter was extremely careful about what she ate. She still had lingering pain and discomfort from GERD. Be sure that the reflux is under control first. Then rule out sensory issues: high or low tone around and in the mouth, hyper active gag. If she has some memory of pain from eating, it might be an issue of training her brain to react to food differently. This might involve setting up a routine, using special plates, placemats, etc and letting her get used to food by seeing it on her plate repeatedly. It can take a while to get into a feeding issue so expect to take a while to move out of it. My daughter is 13 years now and I was sure she would be eating cheerios and apple juice at her senior prom. I am happy to tell you that she eats chinese take out, spinach bagels and many other foods. Oh, one more thing...feeding issues made me pretty unglued. I always say, check your emotions at the kitchen door. As much as possible, try not to make a big deal out of eating/not eating. Be a good role model for healthy eating habits. She is watching you very closely. Good luck! Jan
Jan 20, 2008
jan gambino burns
Jan Gambino, M.Ed
The Reflux Mom
P.O. Box 171
Arnold, Maryland
21012 USA
Mom to Rebecca: reflux and asthma, post nissen fundo, post g tube, post FTT and Jenna: reflux, asthma and POTS.
Author of Reflux 101: A Parent's Guide to Gastroesophageal Reflux.
http://www.lulu.com/content/4999931
Blog: www.healthcentral.com/acid-reflux/c/96
forgot something
Hello! I forgot to add that I found it was very helpful to have a good source of nutrients from vitamins and nutritional drinks during this period of "careful eating". Jan
Feb 04, 2008
scubababy
Hey guys
Some of you may remember me from years past- PJ in TN! Anyway, we are definately experiencing the "careful eating" too Jan. We have come so far from Annie's eating aversions, so I am definately not complaining at this stage in her life. She still eats like bird, smells everything, then feels everything before it goes in her mouth. If it doesn't pass the smell test, it doesn't go down. We are really rewarding her for trying new foods. Rewarding in lots of hugs and kisses, and telling her how proud we are of her. Anyway, I occasionally lurk on this site to see if there's any activity on older (meaning preschool!) kids. I still question her flareups from time to time, and if we are using the right medication to handle the flareups. I may just do separate post on this! Patti
Feb 04, 2008
joy
Dd (7) w/ SPD (sensory processing disorder), hypotonia, GERD, since birth. Previous PT, OT, Early Intervention, special ed, feeding clinic, feeding therapy from 2-3. Reflux meds since 2. Overcame severe feeding challenges, dysphagia, oral aversions, anxiety disorder. Weaned from reflux meds @ 6 1/2 yrs. A true miracle!! Ds (4) Prevacid 30mg, split am/pm; upcoming endoscopy. Ds (9 mos.), nursing, pureed foods, Zantac 1.2 mL 2x/day.
Similar story
Wow! I clicked on your name and read your story, which has a lot of similarities to mine! My daughter has sensory issues too and still rolls bread crumbs by tearing up her bread into little balls, etc. She has hypontonia too. She will be five in a month and a half and weighs around 31 lbs. She went through 13 months of feeding therapy to address sensory- and GERD-related feeding problems. It seems she's starting to get pickier again though. We do a lot of "take 2 bites of (undesired food) and then you can have 2 bites of (favorite food)." Or "if you eat at least x number of bites, then you can watch a movie, have a piece of cake, eat a serving of your desired food, etc. " I also limit her milk because she would be all too happy to make a meal out of milk and never eat any food. That's good that your dtr is willing to touch her food (mashing food with fingers). Has she received OT for the sensory issues? Chewing muscles can wear out quickly, too, with hypotonia.
Check with your
doctor first!